Tag Archives: college

New students who will be attending IUPUI in the fall, were able to experience the new University Tower dining hall as part of their overnight orientation experience Wednesday, June 12, 2013.

Hungry hungry students

With the Hollywood depictions of frat bros chugging beer and hippies snacking on munchies, the starving college student might seem like a myth.

Yet student hunger in higher education is no folk tale. Although the national data on college student hunger is abysmal, recent surveys suggest that show many students don’t get enough to eat.

One study by researchers at the Wisconsin Hope Lab found that nearly one in five students reported that they did not have enough money to buy food, ate less than they felt they should or cut down the size of their meals.

Stephen Smith talks to an author of that report, Katharine Broton.

student debt

The facts and fictions of student debt

Stories all over the news have identified a new crisis in the United States: student debt. They say debt is crushing college students, topping $1 trillion dollars overall. That’s more than both credit card and auto loans; it’s second only to mortgages.

Yet our guest this week says that scary trillion-dollar number isn’t what we should focus on.

Sandy Baum is a senior fellow at the Urban Institute and author of Student Debt: Rhetoric and Realities of Higher Education Financing.

Baum says loans provide access to college for students who couldn’t other wise afford it. Instead of dismissing debt out of hand, every student should evaluate what kind of higher education is worth it for them.

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Going to college in prison

Recently, the U.S. Department of Education announced plans to reinstate federal scholarships for incarcerated prisoners. Through 67 different colleges and universities, an estimated 12,000 inmates will receive Pell Grants to pursue higher education.

Congressional Republicans repudiated the program, questioning why people who have committed crimes deserve scholarship money while plenty of law-abiding citizens cannot afford college.

Advocates say prison education improves the lives of prisoners and betters society at the same time. A 2014 report showed those inmates who took college classes had a 43% lower chance of going back to prison.

Sean Pica is one such advocate. He is the Executive Director of Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison. Pica spoke with APM Reports producer Samara Freemark.


Should colleges teach men how to be men?

Today, women are more likely to go to college than men. And they perform better academically once they get there.

This has some experts wondering why – and what policymakers can do about it.

Andrew Reiner wrote about this in a recent New York Times op-ed “Teaching Men to Be Emotionally Honest.” He cites research that argues: “boys’ underperformance in school has more to do with society’s norms about masculinity than with anatomy, hormones or brain structure.”

Reiner is a professor at Towson University in Baltimore. He joins host Stephen Smith on the podcast to chat about it.