The Utility of a PhD

Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.

What’s unfair about college grad rates

Our guest says the way graduation rates are calculated is not fair to low-income, first generation college-goers or to the institutions that serve them. (Like his.)

What teachers need

Education correspondent Emily Hanford talks with author Elizabeth Green about her new book, Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone).

Intelligence is achievable and other lessons from The Teacher Wars

Education correspondent Emily Hanford continues her conversation with Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars.

Teaching: The most embattled profession

Education correspondent Emily Hanford talks with bestselling author Dana Goldstein about her new book, The Teacher Wars.

Video games: New literacy for a complex world

Author James Paul Gee says video games are problems to solve that come with their own tools. He says they're like "an external mind," and teachers should use them in classrooms.

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.

University of Texas at El Paso: Opportunity U.

University of Texas at El Paso President Diana Natalicio has a problem with the "nontraditional student." She doesn't like the term. "It suggests that you're not something, rather than that you are something new," she says.